Forbiddenshutterstock_125208914

5 Aspects Of Google Policies That All PPC Advertisers Should Know

Add Your Comments

Forbiddenshutterstock_125208914

 

Get to grips with the PPC advertising essentials of Google’s policies and make sure your Google AdWords campaign remains in Google’s good books.

Even the most experienced PPC managers and PPC advertisers need to read up every now and then on Google’s advertising policies. All advertisers who manage a Google AdWords campaign on any scale must be fully up-to-date when it comes to Google Policies.

A conscious effort to remain aware of Google Policies can prevent you from falling victim to a Google AdWords ban and can help you to make better decisions when it comes to the optimization of your Google AdWords campaign, which in turn can help to improve the success of your online marketing efforts in general.

So, which are the most important Google Policies of the moment? Notice anything on the list below that you simply weren’t aware of? Isn’t it lucky that we are here to help you?

1. Mobile advertisements

Unless you live in a hole, deep inside a mountain on another planet, you probably know that Google AdWords allows you to run PPC advertisements on mobile devices. This means you can market your business or product to potential clients when they are surfing the internet on their cellphones, tablets and iPads.

What you perhaps didn’t know is that Google’s Policy on mobile advertising clearly states that all landing pages which are linked to from PPC advertisements on the mobile network MUST be optimized for mobile devices. This is not something that is recommended to you by Google as an advertiser. It is something demanded of you under Google AdWords advertising policy.

This means if you haven’t yet optimized the landing pages linked to from your mobile campaign, you need to do so and fast, because before too long Google will catch up with you and you could face some severe penalties.

What’s more, Flash is NOT allowed on landing pages for mobile devices. Naturally, if you consider what the internet user experience would be like with a Flash-heavy page on a cell phone, it’s obvious why Google doesn’t want advertisers to use Flash in their mobile websites. However, did you know that this was a rule? Maybe not, but now you do. It is time to get this side of your pay-per-click advertising campaign strategy sorted out.

2. Repetition

Most Google AdWords advertisers know full well that “Deals, Deals, Deals” in their advertisement text is going to land them in deep water with Google.

Google Policy clearly states that repetition is advertisement text is NOT allowed. However, how many pay-per-click advertisers know about the ways in which repetition can be used when creating advertising text to be used as part of a Google AdWords campaign?

For example, you can repeat an important keyword or phrase various times throughout an advertisement if it is sufficiently distributed on different lines of the advertisement and clearly broken up by other pieces of text. Take the two examples illustrated below as examples of what IS and ISN’T allowed under Google Policy…

Bad Example advertisement:

Free mortgage quote
Free mortgage quote
Free mortgage quote
example.com

Good Example advertisement:

Free mortgage quote
Get a Free mortgage quote.
Request a Free mortgage quote!
example.com

3. Keyword Insertion and Clarity

PPC advertisers need to be very careful with this Google Policy. A lack of clarity through keyword insertion is something that can result in a Google ban, but the advertiser needs to be very alert at all times in order to recognize when he or she might be wandering into bad territory.

What might make perfect sense to you, might not make perfect sense to an AdWords regulator. Take the example advertisement below:

Free games no downloads
Search Free games no downloads
View Free games no downloads
example.com

There are a number of different ways of reading the advertisement copy above, and plenty of places in each line of text where the emphasis can be placed. The rhythm of the advertisement and the meaning understood from it as a result is not entirely clear. This “vague” quality is what Google demands its advertisers stay clear from. Google wants meaning to be crystal clear in all advertisements published on its network and you are liable to get into a lot of trouble if you ignore this really important Google Policy.

Pay-per-click advertisers who are already under Google’s radar for creating problem advertisements should be particularly careful as it is demonstrative of a very slack approach to the creation of Google AdWords advertisement text and one that will not be tolerated.

4. Adult or Non-Family Approval Status

Did you know that Google DOES allow pay per click advertisers to run advertisements for “adult” content. If you didn’t, you do now. Under Google Policy, it is perfectly acceptable to market “adult” content via Google AdWords.

5. Weapons

Did you also know that under Google Policy, pay-per-click advertisers are NOT allowed to run advertisements which sell weapons of any kind for any purpose? Again, you do now!

Final Thoughts

What’s really important to remember is that while Google’s policies can sometimes change and don’t perhaps all explain everything about the ins and outs of advertising via Google AdWords in full, the policies are in place to weed out the shady advertising characters who are abusing the system of online marketing. Google’s policies are not there to punish or bully the average Joe who’s looking to honestly promote his business via online marketing.

It’s also really important to remember that prevention is better than cure. As a Google AdWords advertiser, you should know everything there is to know about Google Policy and you should make the effort to stay up-to-date in this area on a monthly basis. Times change and things move on quickly.

Ignorance is not a good enough excuse. Make sure you know what you need to know when it comes to what IS and what ISN’T allowed via Google AdWords today.

Image:  Forbidden by Shutterstock

Add Your Comments

  • (will not be published)