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Getting Started with Facebook Advertising: Part 2

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Once you have a Facebook page set up, you can begin the serious business of Facebook advertising. A modern, social alternative to more costly AdWords PPC campaigns, a Facebook advertising campaign can be a much cheaper, less time intensive way to brand build and sell than traditional search engine-based solutions. See Part 1 of this series for what you need to consider before starting advertising with Facebook.

If you’re new to advertising, Facebook is less daunting than AdWords,  but still offers a host of attractive targeting solutions to reassure you that the advert – and by extension your business – is being placed in front of the right kind of internet user.

Facebook bills its advertising network as a chance to “…connect with people who are the right fit for your business.” It does this by harnessing all it knows about its one billion users likes, location and interests. This is a potent mix for the would-be advertiser, because it means you can literally place your brand in front of those already interested in what you’re selling.

The social network estimates that those who like your Facebook page spend twice as much as those who don’t. With this in mind,  the advertising platform offers businesses lots of options to increase their engagement.

1. Decide What You Want To Do

There are a number of things you can do with a Facebook advert. The social network gives you the option to do a range of  things via an advert including;

Get more page likes – this type of advert will have a headline, an image and a line or two of body text. Users clicking on the ad will go through to your brand’s Facebook page rather than your company website.

Promote a post – if you have a specific post on your Facebook page which would benefit from a higher profile, you can choose to promote that specific post. This gives it a more prominent position in newsfeeds and means more users are likely to see it when they log in to Facebook. This could be relevant if you have a new product announcement or a special offer.

Increase event attendance – if you are hosting an event such as an opening evening, a show, a launch or a concert for example, you can use a Facebook ad to increase attendance. The advert will show to users who are more likely to want to attend your event, helping to make the date a success.

2. Creating the Advert

Just as with PPC advertising, your Facebook ad will have an advert title and a limited space for body text. Unlike PPC ads, you can also add an image on the Facebook ad such as a logo or other picture.

The standard rules of ad writing apply – make sure the title is catchy and the body text clear, concise and snappy. The picture should also be eye-catching. The space for the image is quite small but that doesn’t mean that it should be boring – use all of the space as creatively as possible by introducing bright colors or an eye-catching logo if your brand is well-known. Facebook allows 100 x 72 pixels for the image which is a small thumbnail size. Choosing the image is possibly the  most challenging part of the ad creation process on Facebook.

When you have input the ad text and image, you’ll see a section below the input screen called sponsored stories. This gives you the option to increase your profile by allowing Facebook users to discover your brand through their friend’s activity. In practice this means that Facebook will show users who don’t like your page when a friend does like your page or performs an activity such as ‘check ins’ to your business location. You don’t need to assign any extra budget to take advantage of this feature.

Now that you have an advert set up, you’re ready to dive in to the targeting and budgeting options. We’ll cover these in the final part of this series.

Image:  I Like Facebook — Original Billboard Image from Shutterstock

About the Author

Rebecca is the managing director of search engine optimization agency Dakota Digital a full-service agency offering SEO, online PR, web copywriting, media relationship management, and social media strategy. Rebecca works directly with each client to increase online visibility, brand profile, and search engine rankings. She has headed a number of international campaigns for large brands.

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