Google Gives More Post-Panda Insight Into Building High-Quality Sites: Part 2 of 3

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This is Part 2 of a three-part post on building high-quality sites in a post-Panda environment. Part 1  is here.

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What factors does Google seek for a high-quality site? (continued) …

Trust: Would you trust the information contained within this web page or article? Trust is a hallmark of a good website and is critical to converting browsers into buyers. Search users happening on your site need to feel that they can give their credit card details and contact information in good faith. They will not buy from you unless they feel that this trust is warranted.

Making contact information readily accessible (never underestimate the power of providing a phone number for customer services on your site) and providing quotes, back up statistics, facts, figures and reviews can all help to tip the balance in your favor.

Expert Status: Hopefully you’ve read all of the online PR and article marketing tips contained within this website. If that’s the case, your articles or web pages will undoubtedly tick off this requirement with no further work needed.

While we got an insight into the importance of expertise with Panda, Google has confirmed that the depth of information contained within a page or article is a factor. You don’t need a degree in the topic at hand so don’t make the mistake of thinking that you can’t write new content. Enthusiastic proponents of a subject, product or service can write content that meets the Google expert requirement – it just means that articles or web pages need to be detailed and provide a decent introduction or development of the subject. Extremely weak articles that are light on facts and of little practical use (think old style article marketing) won’t cut it.

This particular requirement is one of the reasons some traditional article marketing sites have been tightening up their requirements since the latest big algorithm change as the abundance of very short articles that glossed over anything practical saw their rankings torpedo.

Unique: Content must be unique to make it into Google’s good books. So while it’s advisable to create a news or information section on your website and update it regularly with fresh new content, rehashing the same topic over and over again won’t do your rankings any favors.

One of the issues that Google will pay attention to when crawling your site is whether the same article is repeated over and over with different keyword variations. This goes back to the user experience – you want to be creative and provide a suite of useful information. Imagine a library. When you go to a library, you may head for the gardening section. There’ll be many books about gardening but they’ll each be different with different tips and tricks and points of focus.

Developing your website content should follow this same theme; you want to collate a range of articles on the same topic but, each article should tackle a different issue. In the case of the website selling leather sofas above, articles could include how to look after a leather sofa, treatments used to protect the leather sofa from wear and tear, the process the hides go through to make a leather sofa, where the hides are sourced, the history of the leather sofa…. all of these ideas allow the website owner to work on the central ‘leather sofa’ keyword but each article is unique and substantially different to the one before it. They are all topics that a user wanting to buy a leather sofa could be interested in, ticking off the user experience at the same time.

Discover the rest of the factors Google has unveiled as being crucial to the development of a high-quality website in Part 3 …

About the Author

Rebecca is the managing director of search engine optimization agency Dakota Digital a full-service agency offering SEO, online PR, web copywriting, media relationship management, and social media strategy. Rebecca works directly with each client to increase online visibility, brand profile, and search engine rankings. She has headed a number of international campaigns for large brands.

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3 Comments

  1. Isn't this all common sense? Regardless of Google, websites should be built with these core factors. For way too long, no one understood that you had to serve two masters. It just makes sense to build with integrity, doesn't it?

  2. The uniqueness of the content is a bit debatable in my opinion. A lot of information is shuffled around and posted as surprisingly new and different from the source it was copied ... "7 tips on Social Media you can't miss out on!" etc Well, I guess that's the playfull part which is probably also the charming aspect of the web ...

  3. Content must be unique to make it into Google’s good books. That is really important! Thanks for the nice article!