With AdWords, Timing Can Make All The Difference

2 comments

Caught up on my reading over the weekend, once my email server got fixed. Apparently, the outage affected tons of people across Canada and those unfortunate enough to have switched to VOiP in one city also lost phone service. Let’s hope the cell towers were still working.

Although there was a lot of news, one really important tidbit stuck out for AdWords users. With Google now offering dayparting, they are giving everyone until July 30th to set a desired timezone in their AdWords account. If you don’t set a timezone that reflects either your location or a timezone that you want your account to be tied to, you will turn into a pumpkin and be set at PST (Pacific Standard Time) for all eternity. In fact, you can only choose your timezone this one time – no changing timezones later. Here’s a link to the info.

Wonder if they’ll make an exception if you pull up stakes and move to another timezone? And what about companies with different locations in different states but only one account? And why would it be so difficult for Google to change your timezone? Maybe once the much-maligned Google pay system finally debuts, you’ll be able to “buy” a timezone change. Hey, just a sec, you’re already paying for running your ads! Someone please stop the merry-go-round … I’m getting dizzy.

About the Author

Frances Krug has worked in market research since graduating from UCLA with an MA and CPhil in Latin American history. As an editor and online content provider for the last 7 years, she currently is Associate Editor at iNET Interactive, where she also directs Search Marketing Standard's email marketing program.

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2 Comments

  1. Sameer

    Makes no sense to charge for time zone change. Google should concentrate on getting revenue from the Ads and not from uncalled for fees. If they do that, then they really do need some healthy competition ....MSN?

  2. Frances

    Thanks for the comment, Sameer. I, too, think it'll be a big mistake if Google starts charging for anything to do with the AdWords program. Everytime they add a new feature, though, they have to hope they get more new advertisers to cover the cost of the new features or it will cut into their profit margin.

    Competition is very good and needed. I personally am not thrilled with the thought of MSN on top. Microsoft controls enough of the "online experience" already, not to speak of offline market saturation. Not a slam at Microsoft necessarily, but do they know what "healthy" competition means, based on prior behavior?